Research

Insights Shared at Research Retreat to Shape Future Food Allergy Care

On Saturday, April 13, food allergy investigators and patient advocates came together in McLean, VA, for the Seventh Annual FARE Research Retreat. The gathering included 120 clinicians, industry representatives, scientists in academia and public service, and directors from the 33 Centers of Excellence in the FARE Clinical Network. Together, they shared experimental findings and explored new opportunities to fulfill FARE’s mission: to improve the quality of life and health for patients with food allergy and provide hope through the promise of new treatments.

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Q&A With Robert Anthony, FARE Investigator in Food Allergy

Robert M. Anthony, PhD, is an associate professor at Harvard Medical School and a principal investigator in the Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital. He received a mid-career FARE Investigator in Food Allergy award in 2017. Here he discusses his research on how the glycosylation of allergy-associated IgE antibodies – that is, the addition of sugars molecules to IgE proteins – might influence food allergy. Dr. Anthony will be presenting an update on his work at the 2019 FARE Research Retreat, to...

Q&A with Stephanie Eisenbarth, FARE Investigator in Food Allergy

Stephanie Eisenbarth, MD, PhD, is an associate professor of Laboratory Medicine, of Immunobiology and of Medicine (Immunology) at Yale School of Medicine. She received a 2017 Mid-Career FARE Investigator in Food Allergy Award for her research on a rare, inherited sensitivity to food allergens that could shed light on the mechanisms of food allergies in the wider population. Dr. Eisenbarth will be presenting an update on her work at the 2019 FARE Research Retreat, to be held April 13 in McLean, VA.

What first attracted you to food...

Peanut Immunotherapy Update: DBV Technologies

At last weekend’s annual scientific meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Aimmune Therapeutics and DBV Technologies presented updates on the two immunotherapies for peanut allergy that have progressed farthest in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval process for bringing new drugs to market. Yesterday, we posted on the FARE Blog some of the data reported by Aimmune. Here, we present findings released by DBV.

Photo: DBV Technologies

DBV Technologies submitted a Biologics License Application to FDA...

Peanut Immunotherapy Update: Aimmune Therapeutics

At last weekend’s annual scientific meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Aimmune Therapeutics and DBV Technologies presented updates on the two immunotherapy approaches for peanut allergy that have progressed farthest in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval process for bringing new drugs to market. Here we present findings released by Aimmune Therapeutics; tomorrow, we’ll feature research recently published by DBV Technologies.

Photo: Aimmune Therapeutics

In December 2018, Aimmune submitted a...

Report from AAAAI 2019

Report From AAAAI 2019

This weekend’s annual scientific meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology features hundreds of research presentations, many of which provide noteworthy new findings in the field of food allergy. FARE staff are attending the San Francisco conference along with thousands of allergists, immunologists, researchers and other healthcare providers. Here are highlights from some of Sunday’s presentations in the field of food allergy.

 

Report from AAAAI 2019

Report From AAAAI 2019

This weekend’s annual scientific meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology features hundreds of research presentations, many of which provide noteworthy new findings in the field of food allergy. FARE staff are attending the San Francisco conference along with thousands of allergists, immunologists, researchers and other healthcare providers. Here are highlights from some of Saturday’s presentations focusing on the food allergy field.

 

Study: Peanut-Specific IgE B Cells Reveal Their Mysteries

Last month, researchers at Stanford University published a study that shed new light on blood cells that play an essential role in peanut allergy. These very rare IgE B cells make peanut-specific IgE antibodies that, when bound to peanut protein, can trigger the release of histamines and other molecules that cause reaction symptoms.

B cells are a type of white blood cell that can bind to a foreign protein and secrete its own proteins, called antibodies, to target and attack the foreign protein, or antigen. Different types of B cells produce different types of antibodies, of which IgE are...

New Prevalence Numbers Demand an Aggressive Call to Action

Two recently released large-scale studies of food allergy prevalence have resulted in an update of FARE’s frequently cited statistics that provide estimates on how many people are living with this potentially life-threatening disease.

These new numbers – 32 million Americans, more than double what we previously believed – reinforce that food allergy is a problem of epidemic proportions.

 

“The Public Health Impact of Parent-Reported Childhood Food Allergies in the United States,” an update of a 2011 landmark study published in...

Study: Gut Bacteria of Healthy Human Infants Protect Mice Against Food Allergy

New research has found that bacteria in the feces of healthy human babies protect mice who are sensitized to cow’s milk against severe reactions to milk protein. In contrast, bacteria in the stools of human infants with cow’s milk allergy do not protect milk-sensitized mice from anaphylactic reaction to milk. Published in the journal Nature Medicine, these findings by scientists at the University of Chicago and the University of Naples Federico II might lay the groundwork for future therapies to prevent or treat food allergy by changing the human gut microbiome, the microorganisms that live...