Research

New Study: More Than One in Ten Reactions Treated With Epinephrine Requires More Than One Dose

In a recent study investigating how food allergy patients, parents and caregivers carry and use epinephrine auto-injectors, only 44 percent of survey respondents reported that they always carry at least one auto-injector. Far fewer respondents – 24 percent – followed the recommended practice of always carrying two auto-injectors or more. Now a new study funded by FARE and published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology finds that among epinephrine-treated reactions, more than one in ten required multiple doses of epinephrine to...

Study: Epinephrine Management in Children and Adults

Epinephrine is the first-line treatment for anaphylaxis, a severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction most commonly triggered by food, latex, medication or insect venom. Delayed administration of epinephrine is a risk factor for fatal anaphylaxis to food. To stay safe, individuals with food allergies (or their caregivers) must have ready access to epinephrine, be able to recognize the symptoms of anaphylaxis, and be willing to use epinephrine to treat those symptoms.

To test how personal experiences and social circumstances...

FARE Research Retreat 2018: Human Impacts, Breakthrough Therapies and New Prospects

From left to right: Dr. Drew Bird, Bryan Bunning, Teddy Kider, Gia Rosenblum and Linda Herbert

At the Sixth Annual FARE Research Retreat, held April 13-14, 2018, in McLean, VA, 130 academic scientists, clinical care providers, pharmaceutical industry representatives, government officials and patient advocates came together to discuss progress in food allergy research and identify opportunities to design clinical trials that not only test the effectiveness of new treatments but also reflect and respond to the psychological and social needs of...

Report from AAAAI/WAO 2018: A Spotlight on FARE-Supported Research

Last weekend, representatives from FARE attended a joint congress of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the World Allergy Organization (WAO) in Orlando, FL. As we wrap up our reporting from AAAAI/WAO 2018, we summarize findings from wide-ranging studies that received support from FARE, including investigations of oral food challenges with mixed tree nuts, peanut allergy biomarkers, sublingual immunotherapy to treat peanut allergy, and patient-centered food allergy research. Lastly, we conclude with late-breaking reports from Aimmune’s PALISADE trial for its peanut...

Report from AAAAI/WAO 2018: Severe Anaphylaxis in Children

This weekend, representatives from FARE are attending a joint congress of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the World Allergy Organization (WAO) in Orlando, FL. We’re reporting on selected abstracts from the meeting that address diverse topics in food allergy. Read on to learn more about featured findings about anaphylaxis.

Abstract 470: Characteristics, Morbidity, and Mortality of Anaphylaxis-Associated Admissions to North American PICUs, 2010-2015

Anaphylaxis is a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction that can affect multiple organ systems....

Report from AAAAI/WAO 2018: Reactions to Red Meat Are Rewriting the Rules for Food Allergies

This weekend, representatives from FARE are attending a joint congress of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the World Allergy Organization (WAO) in Orlando, FL. We’re reporting on selected abstracts from the meeting that address diverse topics in food allergy. Read on to learn more about featured findings about allergy to a sugar found in red meat. This emerging disease, which differs in many ways from typical food allergies, is becoming increasingly prevalent

Red meat allergy – also called mammalian meat allergy or alpha-gal allergy – disrupts many of our food...

Report from AAAAI/WAO 2018: New studies on folic acid exposure, EoE and more

This weekend, representatives from FARE are attending a joint congress of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the World Allergy Organization (WAO) in Orlando, FL. We’re reporting on selected abstracts from the meeting that address diverse topics in food allergy. Read on to learn more about some of these featured findings.

Abstract 275: The Association Between Folate/Folic Acid Metabolites and the Development of Food Allergy (FA) in Children

This research was supported by FARE through a 2014 Howard Gittis Memorial Research Award to its lead author, Dr. Emily...

Research Update: Q&A with Michiko Oyoshi, Ph.D.

Michiko Oyoshi, Ph.D., is a Scientific Research Associate at Boston Children’s Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. In 2015, she received a five-year FARE Investigator in Food Allergy Award for her work on maternal factors that influence food tolerance. In a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, her research team found that breastmilk of mothers exposed to egg during pregnancy and breastfeeding protects nursing newborns against egg allergy symptoms. This study in mice reinforces...

Study: Anaphylaxis Is Rare During Clinic-Based, Non-Research Oral Food Challenges

A September 2017 study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology reported that open oral food challenge (OFC) is a relatively safe procedure that offers benefit to patients. The gold standard test to detect food allergy is a double-blind placebo-controlled OFC, in which neither the doctor nor the patient knows whether the patient is consuming allergen or a harmless substitute (the placebo).

In an open OFC, unlike a blinded OFC, no placebo is used; both the doctor and the patient know the patient is eating allergen. However, the patient’s...

Eighty-five percent of the patients were under age 18. A range of raw and baked allergenic foods were tested. Most, but not all, of the OFCs were considered low risk because patients hadn’t reported recent reactions, had a history of tolerating the tested food, had low levels of IgE antibodies to that food, or had IgE antibody levels suspected to result from cross-sensitization (that is, reactivity to a different allergen).

Some, but not all, of the patients had positive skin prick test results prior to their OFC. Historically, about 50 to 60 percent of skin prick tests and blood tests for...

Research Update from ACAAI 2017

At the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), held Oct. 26-30 in Boston, researchers reported that adult-onset food allergies are more common than previously thought, peanut allergy is among the food allergies in children that have become more common since 2010, and most pediatricians are not following new guidelines for early peanut introduction.

Two late-breaking presentations by researchers at Northwestern University School of Medicine and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago examined food allergy in adults and children. A survey...