FARE Blog

Update on Immunotherapies for Peanut Allergy

Two immunotherapy treatments for peanut allergy have completed Phase 3 clinical trials and are nearing submission for regulatory approval. If one or both of these therapies are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), standardized peanut allergy immunotherapy could become available as soon as next year.

On Feb. 20, Aimmune Therapeutics announced results from the PALISADE clinical trial to test the efficacy of AR101, a characterized peanut product for oral immunotherapy. AR101 met its primary endpoint for the trial, demonstrating a very significant difference between response to...

A Fifth-Grader's Perspective on Peter Rabbit

Guest post by Zidaan Kapoor, 11 years old

I have recently seen an article about the food allergy scene in the movie Peter Rabbit. In the movie, Peter Rabbit and his gang have an enemy who is allergic to blackberries. In an effort to harm him, they attack him by throwing blackberries at him. The enemy starts choking and has to use an epinephrine auto-injector.

This scene is important to me because I have life-threatening food allergies to eggs, all nuts, and all seafood. I have had two anaphylactic reactions where I was rushed to the hospital. My...

5 Easy Steps to Be A PAL-entine

For children, Valentine’s Day means school parties, cards for their classmates, and, often, treats such as chocolates, candies, and baked goods. Children with food allergies can feel excluded from the fun. FARE believes every child should have the opportunity to have a safe, inclusive holiday. This Valentine’s Day, you can Be A PAL and help children learn how to be a good friend to kids with food allergies at the same time with these five steps.

1. Provide Non-Food Treats for Your Valentine

Treats don’t have to be food. There are many creative ideas for...

2017 Teen Advisory Group Projects

Each year, members of FARE’s Teen Advisory Group (TAG) serve as leaders in their communities by mentoring other teens, writing for our blog, and helping guide our youth programs. They also take on special projects to help raise awareness and educate others. This year, TAG members focused on digital outreach to expand their message beyond their local community. Here is a wrap-up, in their own words, of what they accomplished this year.

TAG Midwest

According to FARE’s website, teenagers and young adults have the highest risks of fatal allergic reactions,...

With Serious Food Allergies, When Should a Parent Consider Child Counseling?

Guest post by Marté J. Matthews, LMFT

One in 13 American children has a serious food allergy. That’s an estimated 5.9 million young people under the age of 18. Parenting children with food allergies can be a daily tightrope walk as parents wipe down every surface, read every label, and prepare meals from scratch to keep from having their next reaction. Even then, measures of quality of life in families managing food allergies show that tension and anxiety levels --quality of life measures --are higher than for most parents and more similar to families...

Prepare for Valentine’s Day by Reading Your Labels

PAL Valentines Cards PAL

February 14 is fast approaching. Valentine’s Day is celebrated by many with cards, flowers and candy and homemade treats. For children with food allergies (and their parents), Valentine’s Day offers an additional layer of stress due to heightened risk for exposure. Label-reading, while vitally important every day, becomes even more critical at holiday times. By keeping these tips in mind, you can help keep your child safe this Valentine’s Day!

Many candy manufacturers may change packaging for holidays. Specialty holiday items may be produced differently...

Our Impact in 2017

FARE is the leading national advocacy organization working on behalf of the 15 million Americans who have food allergies, including all those at risk for life-threatening anaphylaxis. We work hard to ensure that every dollar raised brings us closer to improving the quality of life and the health of individuals with food allergies, and to providing them hope through the promise of new treatments.

When you support FARE, you’re investing in programs and resources that change – and save – lives. In 2017, your donations helped us make great progress in each area of our mission. Keep reading to...

Eczema and Allergen Sensitization Interact to Strongly Increase Food Allergy Risk

Not all babies with early eczema are at equal risk for other allergic conditions, according to a paper published in November 2017 by the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. One-year-olds who have eczema (atopic dermatitis) and are also sensitized to one or more environmental or food allergens are at starkly greater risk for other allergic conditions at age 3, compared to babies with eczema who are not sensitized.

The term “atopic march” is used to describe a pattern in the natural history of allergic conditions, in which children who have eczema...

Embracing a Mission, I Didn’t Ask For

Guest post by Rachel Packer

Our allergy story is common.  We left the allergist’s office in February 2008 feeling dazed and confused, much like a deer in the headlights. I thought about the French toast I had promised to make Ari (my then three-year-old) for dinner that night. Eggs. Damn. What do I do? I started to feel hot and panicky as we walked to the car. I looked at my husband and suddenly, it began to dawn on me that this was going to change…everything.

Then, I was resentful that I had been given a mission I didn’t ask for and that our lives were...

Living Well with My Food Allergies

Guest post by Joshua Sylvester

When I was two and a half years old I tried a peanut for the first time. I began to vomit and my face and eyes became swollen to the point that I could barely see. My mom immediately took me to the doctor’s office where I learned that I had a life-threatening anaphylactic allergy to peanuts.

I grew up in a small town in Oklahoma and was the first kid in the town to be diagnosed with a food allergy. The concept of a food allergy was foreign to some people in this town and when it came time for me to attend kindergarten, my...

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